WHY
DRONE
ON

Opinions, Technology

28 December 2018

WHY
DRONE
ON

Opinions, Technology

28 December 2018

OPINIONS

Expensive toy or useful tool?

By Graeme Hodges | Founder, 33Hz Limited

Drone technology continues to improve at a prolific rate. Unfortunately, the human brain doesn’t. Is it any wonder why we are suddenly reading about pranksters doing stupid things with these devices, invading peoples privacy and causing potentially catastrophic accidents.

You can now buy small drones in Halfords and some service stations. In the wrong hands, these things can be incredibly dangerous. In the right hands, a drone can be an extremely productive tool. You only need to look at some of the cinematography techniques used in feature films, commercials, Netflix shows and even some YouTube channels, and you’ll find that drone footage plays a pivotal role in significantly increasing the production value.

Because of the quality and stability of image capturing combined with the low price point, is it any wonder why we see drones deployed for all sorts of weird and diverse jobs.

I have a passion for technology, and I always try to find a way of introducing new technologies into the solutions we create for our clients, something that will add value and purpose.

TUSCANY STOP: IF ONLY WE’D HAD A DRONE

While working on the Tuscany Stop project, it became apparent that we lacked aerial images and video. We had an abundance of ground-level digital images from almost every angle, room and location as well as some stunning Virtual Reality data. When we processed the VR data, we were blown away by the interior scenes and underwhelmed by the generated exterior model.

There was nothing we could do to improve what we had captured, but it convinced me to have a solution in place for the next VR project we were commissioned to do.

Months later, I am now a CAA qualified PfCO (Permission for Commercial Operations) Drone Pilot or operative. I enrolled onto an intense 3-day course that not only taught me the practical skills of controlling a drone but also in-depth knowledge of rules and regulations that have to be strictly followed to attain the qualification. Each time I embark on a commercial project, you would not believe the amount of paperwork I have to fill out even before I fire up the craft!

To me, this is a sensible way of preventing a gold rush approach to commercial drone projects. These things can be dangerous, and you need to respect not only the craft but the space you’re flying it in.

We can now return to Montecastello and deploy a drone to map the exterior of the property to create a more realistic 3D representation. Combining this with the existing VR content will create a more engaging solution.

Next time you see a drone zipping through the sky hopefully it’s being controlled by a sensible person whose task is to survey, film, deliver, track, find or race.

OPINIONS

Expensive toy or useful tool?

By Graeme Hodges
Founder, 33Hz Limited

Drone technology continues to improve at a prolific rate. Unfortunately, the human brain doesn’t. Is it any wonder why we are suddenly reading about pranksters doing stupid things with these devices, invading peoples privacy and causing potentially catastrophic accidents.

You can now buy small drones in Halfords and some service stations. In the wrong hands, these things can be incredibly dangerous. In the right hands, a drone can be an extremely productive tool. You only need to look at some of the cinematography techniques used in feature films, commercials, Netflix shows and even some YouTube channels, and you’ll find that drone footage plays a pivotal role in significantly increasing the production value.

Because of the quality and stability of image capturing combined with the low price point, is it any wonder why we see drones deployed for all sorts of weird and diverse jobs.

I have a passion for technology, and I always try to find a way of introducing new technologies into the solutions we create for our clients, something that will add value and purpose.

TUSCANY STOP: IF ONLY WE’D HAD A DRONE

While working on the Tuscany Stop project, it became apparent that we lacked aerial images and video. We had an abundance of ground-level digital images from almost every angle, room and location as well as some stunning Virtual Reality data. When we processed the VR data, we were blown away by the interior scenes and underwhelmed by the generated exterior model.

There was nothing we could do to improve what we had captured, but it convinced me to have a solution in place for the next VR project we were commissioned to do.

Months later, I am now a CAA qualified PfCO (Permission for Commercial Operations) Drone Pilot or operative. I enrolled onto an intense 3-day course that not only taught me the practical skills of controlling a drone but also in-depth knowledge of rules and regulations that have to be strictly followed to attain the qualification. Each time I embark on a commercial project, you would not believe the amount of paperwork I have to fill out even before I fire up the craft!

To me, this is a sensible way of preventing a gold rush approach to commercial drone projects. These things can be dangerous, and you need to respect not only the craft but the space you’re flying it in.

We can now return to Montecastello and deploy a drone to map the exterior of the property to create a more realistic 3D representation. Combining this with the existing VR content will create a more engaging solution.

Next time you see a drone zipping through the sky hopefully it’s being controlled by a sensible person whose task is to survey, film, deliver, track, find or race.

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